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Understanding Your Insurance Card

By Ayo Mseka on Sep 3, 2020 5:31:33 PM

The following article from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) provides some useful information on accessing and using your health insurance card:

Did you know some of the essential information you need to access your health insurance coverage is on your card? It contains the necessary information about your plan and whom it covers.

Health plans usually give you one or two insurance cards. If you don’t get an insurance card, after enrolling in a new plan, call your health insurance company. You also may have the option to print a paper copy of your card from your health plan’s website.

When you receive your insurance card, check the information on the card. While the information displayed on the card varies from plan to plan, it’s important to verify that it is correct. Check out our interactive insurance card tool “What to Ask When You Receive Your Health Insurance Card” and ask yourself:

Does the information match your coverage selections?

  • Is the plan type correct?
  • Is the network name what you expected?
  • Are the cost-sharing amounts right?
  • If there is a Primary Care Provider (PCP) listed on your insurance card, is the information correct?

If any of the information is wrong, call your health plan right away to have it corrected.

Keep your insurance card with you at all times. You’ll need to show your insurance card whenever you receive health care services or talk to a health care provider (a doctor, for example) in person. You’ll need the information on your card when you speak on the phone about your plan or look for information on your plan’s website. If you have coverage under more than one health plan (for instance, if you have coverage through work, but you also have coverage under your spouse’s health benefits), you should bring both insurance cards.

Protect your insurance. You should protect this card like you would other sensitive personal and financial information. If you misplace your health insurance card, you’ll want to get a replacement. You can contact your health plan to request a new card.

As part of the association’s state-based system of insurance regulation in the United States, NAIC provides expertise, data, and analysis for insurance commissioners to effectively regulate the industry and protect consumers.

For more information, visit www.naic.org

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